One fine day

I finally got a chance to listen to the new album of Sting, one of my favourite artists: “57th and 9th”. By definition, it’s good – Sting has never recorded any unsuccessful songs! But why am I talking about some CD on a blog about maths and climate science?

Because this album contains a single that drew attention of my inner climate activist. In “One Fine Day”  Sting touches on the problem of the climate change. The artist points out at different types of climate sceptics. So we have optimists, histories, apologists and even scientists, who believe there’s not much we can do.

The singer makes an appeal to political leaders to heal the planet quickly. Some say it’s rather wishful thinking but, come on, we’re talking about a song, not an IPCC report! Although “Three penguins and a bear got drowned” part is a bit too cheesy for me to handle.

The lyrics aren’t the best and I know that Sting can do better. I mean, he’s the author of such jewels as “Englishman in New York” or “Fragile”. So why did I get so excited about this particular song? Because people like Sting and listen to him. This is what we need right now: a casual message about the dire issue of climate change, conveyed via a catchy song. I don’t care how people realise that we have a problem, as long as they DO realise is somehow. Buying a new CD is as good a way as any other.

Some criticise Sting for hypocrisy. Well, the truth is that an owner of eight residences scattered all over the world who travels between them on a private jet does contribute to the climate change quite significantly. However, as I stated before: it’s ok not to be perfect. It might be the case that Sting’s popularity will raise awareness of climate change, which can do more good to the planet than his flights to numerous concerts.

I hope we won’t see the times  “when snakes can talk and pigs will fly”. It’s up to us!

Image from MetroLyrics.
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3 thoughts on “One fine day

  1. Yes, that true. Celebrities/media have big power to affect society behaviour. For example, during my undergraduate studies I was a volunteer in one oncology institute in Poland. Someday, one episode of popular polish TV series raised the issue of early breast cancer detection. On the next day in the institute I saw a lot women to breast examination. Just one episode but it can save life of many people.

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    1. Does it mean that watching TV shows isn’t necessarily procrastinating? 😀

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      1. That depends;) Unfortunately, for many people (especially in old age) TV is the only source of information. So appropriate TV shows can be very informative to those people. In that case this is not a procrastination but learning. Of course, it depends on what kind of TV shows they are watching:)

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